Use and distribution of this article is subject to our terms and conditions
whereby bowlingball.com's information and copyright must be included.

Two Modern Walking Patterns On The Bowling Approach


If you are a right handed bowler aspiring to greater performances and hook the bowling ball, then it benefits you to walk left and throw right.

Right handed bowlers who hook the ball gain delivery path accuracy because walking left easily allows for the swing path to align with the delivery path. The opposite walking pattern works for left handed players.

This walking path strategy allows for the swing to follow the direction the upper body and result in an inside-out forward swing path toward the sighting target on the lane.

Walking left on the approach will help you realign your bowling ball at the top of the backswing from behind your shoulder position and tuck it in behind your shoulder blade slightly to accommodate a left to right swing path.

Successful coaches today teach two techniques which typically accomplish the same end.

One technique for walking left, using a 4 step approach as a reference to describe these techniques, encourages good balance has been around for several decades and was one of the techniques used by former coaching great and PBA Hall of Fame Champion, Don Johnson.

This technique goes as follows:

1. The first step with the right foot moves straight ahead from it initial positioning.

2. The second step with the left foot steps to the left about 5 boards.

3. The third step with the right foot steps in front of the second step in a tightrope fashion as to step along the center of your torso.

4. The final slide step slides to the right and under the chin or between the shoulders. This slide step supports your body weight and builds a stable and balanced platform to deliver the ball. The sliding bowling shoe should enter the foul line in a fairly straight line so the toe points to the pocket.


The pattern is more easily recalled as "straight on one, left about 5 boards on two, overlap on three, and slide under the center of your body on four."

The next technique is very similar as goes as follows:

1. The first step with the right foot moves left from it initial positioning about 5 boards.

2. The second step is straight.

3. The third step with the right foot steps in front of the second step in a tightrope fashion as to step along the center of your torso.

4. The final slide step slides to the right and under the chin or between the shoulders.

This pattern can be simplified as “left on the 1st step, striaight on two, overlap on three, and slide under the body center on four.”

Of course, if you use a five step approach with either technique, the first step is straight to get you into motion, then the remaining four steps follow the above described patterns.

Both walking patterns can serve you well.

With some practice, supervised practice with a bowling instructor, you can change your walking path comfortably and effectively to accommodate your inside-to-outside swing and delivery path while keeping your swing tucked closely to your body on the forward swing.

Anytime a footwork change is made, you will have to adjust your present alignment system for strike and spares by making this change to match with your walking pattern.

If you work on your game and are presently walking straight or to the right, then strongly consider these walking path changes.

Walk left, throw right, and reduce the number of shots you deliver inside your target line.







 



Security Verified Seal





    follow us on Twitter