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Focus On Your Bowling Follow Through


Focus on your bowling swing follow through for improved accuracy and speed control. Since the follow through motion refers to the completion of your arm swing process, it is important to finish your approach in a properly posted position so you can follow through and gain the accuracy you seek.

If you boast a respectable average and struggling a bit during competition, then focus on your follow through so you can key on getting your bowling ball headed to your sighting target and regulate your ball speed at the same time.

Here are important factors in understanding the follow through motion:

Once your bowling hand exits the ball, the follow through begins. Since you have selected a sighting target on the lane, then completing your swing and releasing your ball along your intended delivery path is critical for accuracy and for hitting the pocket.

Finishing your follow through in a consistent manner each delivery will help you when you get into trouble controlling your shot direction during competition.

Since the release zone, the part of the swing cycle where your hand releases the bowling ball, is near the very bottom of the swing arc or slightly forward on the upswing, then a good rule of thumb is to continue swinging your hand and arm in an upward motion along the swing arc and in the direction of your target.

If you are a power player and hook the ball a great deal, then you likely have your shoulders and hips open in relation to your sighting target to accommodate getting a wide enough of a bowling ball delivery angle down the lane.

"Power" players appear to follow through to the left of target because their shoulders and hips are so far open. They will, in all likelihood be following through toward their target if you can watch the swing movement in slow-motion.

"Straight ball" players appear to have their shoulders aimed left of target during their delivery motion. In order to get sufficient angle of entry into the pocket, a straight ball player must release the ball from an outside-to-inside swing path to avoid missing the head pin.

"Stroker" type players using a small hook can square up their shoulders and hips to the foul line as they post and release their bowling ball. The follow through appears as though the bowling hand follows the ball to the target on the lane.

It helps to maintain a posted position where you are not moving at the foul line as you complete your bowling slide step. Remaining stationary as you release your ball and following through is vital to overall control.

Your bowling arm elbow should complete the swing arc at least shoulder level or higher. Avoid your bowling shoulder thrusting forward ahead of your non-bowling shoulder once your ball has exited your hand.


Try and avoid abbreviating your follow through by stopping your hand and arm near your bowling slide knee level after the ball is released. Instead, allow your elbow of your bowling arm to continue in an upward movement where your elbow reaches shoulder height at the minimum.

Once again, resist the urge of “over-reaching” to your target when you follow through so you do not pull yourself off of balance or pull your ball off of your intended delivery path. Reach up, not out.

Avoid decelerating your forward swing. Always accelerate your forward swing to a full and complete follow through posted position.

A decelerated swing motion invites an early-turning action where your bowling fingers rotate your ball sooner than needed which, in turn, can cause you to pull your shot off line.

If you learn to swing at about 90% of full power, post up at the foul line, and complete your follow through, your chances at maintaining good balance and accuracy during competition are increased.










 



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