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Be Sure About Your Bowling Adjustment


If you want to raise your average, be sure about your bowling adjustment. When you think it is time to make some type of adjustment to hit the pocket, after missing one or more consecutive frames, it is important to know the adjustment you choose will get the job done.

Since there are several adjustments you can choose when you need to find the pocket again, make certain you avoid over adjusting and missing the pocket again.

It is so commonplace for you as a bowler to over plan a simple adjustment, making two adjustments instead of the single adjustment you originally thought would work.

Case and point - you think you need a slight angle change to pick up some skid length because your bowling ball hit high and you did not get your ball into an area in or near the pocket where you could get a strike.

You make the move with your feet and where you sight on the lane knowing you will pick up the extra skid distance to hold your ball from hooking high in the pocket or on the “nose”.

If you make the adjustment you planned but you added another at the last moment, such as picking up more ball speed or changing your release, you made two adjustments instead of merely the angle change you figured out to be the right solution.

Now your ball skids too far and you leave the “bucket” or the “washout.”

You made two adjustments when you knew that the one angle change adjustment was all you needed.

Now you paid the price for indecision. You paid the price for over correcting. Somewhere in your mind you doubted your decision that the angle change would have done the job.

What you can learn from this example is to know your adjustments and what each will do on given lane conditions during competition.


Since you can change ball speed, make a release change, make a loft distance change, make delivery angle changes, and change bowling balls when you need to make an adjustment, make sure you understand what each will accomplish before deciding to make multiple adjustments for one bad ball reaction.

When you make a clear decision to use one of your many adjustment techniques, trust your instinct, trust what your eyes see, and ultimately trust your judgement.

Resist the urge to do more than is really needed.

Keep your decisions simple in competition.










 



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